~the living Goddess~
Vionnet collection for Spring/Summer 2015 is all about the revived grecian goddess idea. The house has always been known for its connection with ancient greek aesthetics and this collection re-inforces this link and continuity. The woman of Vionnet is graceful, fluid and certain of her femininity almost like an olympian Goddess, chic without needing to state more than the absolutely necessary.

~The Muse archetype is all about mystery and a certain charm, an ageless quality of a woman that’s not just a sexual siren but also a carrier of wisdom, the Muse may seem distant but that’s just also an illusion, she’s only distant until summoned, one has to contemplate and gather the right words, the appropriate intentions and then the Muse appears and manifests herself as glorious as ever.~Photo: Serge Lutens make up inventions are actually artistic interventions of very high aesthetics, from the book L’esprit Serge Lutens.

~The Muse archetype is all about mystery and a certain charm, an ageless quality of a woman that’s not just a sexual siren but also a carrier of wisdom, the Muse may seem distant but that’s just also an illusion, she’s only distant until summoned, one has to contemplate and gather the right words, the appropriate intentions and then the Muse appears and manifests herself as glorious as ever.~

Photo: Serge Lutens make up inventions are actually artistic interventions of very high aesthetics, from the book L’esprit Serge Lutens.

As he spoke, Iris, swift-footed as the wind, led Aphrodite from the conflict, her lovely flesh stained with blood, and she distraught with pain, and suffering grievously. They found fierce Ares, on the left flank, his two war-horses, with their golden harness, close by, his spear leaning on a cloud. Sinking to her knees, she begged the loan of her dear brother’s steeds: ‘Save me, brother dear, lend me your team, to reach Olympus, my home among the immortals. I am sorely hurt by this wound, dealt by a mortal, son of Tydeus, who would challenge Father Zeus himself.’The Iliad by Homer, Book V. Venus wounded by Diomedes returns to Olympus by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, 1800.

As he spoke, Iris, swift-footed as the wind, led Aphrodite from the conflict, her lovely flesh stained with blood, and she distraught with pain, and suffering grievously. They found fierce Ares, on the left flank, his two war-horses, with their golden harness, close by, his spear leaning on a cloud. Sinking to her knees, she begged the loan of her dear brother’s steeds: ‘Save me, brother dear, lend me your team, to reach Olympus, my home among the immortals. I am sorely hurt by this wound, dealt by a mortal, son of Tydeus, who would challenge Father Zeus himself.’
The Iliad by Homer, Book V.



Venus wounded by Diomedes returns to Olympus by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, 1800.

~The Spirit Eternal against darkness~
   There’s this moving story somehow proving the victory of the will over physical exhaustion, the overcoming of the obstacles and of course the spirit of humanistic offering. This is the story of the greek marathon runner Stelios Kyriakides, a paradigm of courage against nazism and despair.
Stelios took part in the 1936 summer olympics in Berlin, in a Germany bewitched by Hitler and his empty rhetorics…Stelios was placed 11th in his sport. The years that passed proved more than hard for greece struggling underneath the german occupation, people were starving and Kyriakides found himself in no better circumstances. In 1946 a malnourished Kyriakides  took a daring decision although not in any way in an appropriate shape. He raised some money for his trip with the help of friends and decided to run the Boston Marathon so to gather money for the impoverished children of greece but also intrigue the international attention on the matter. He had this conviction that no one else shared with him, he knew he was going to win the race, if not for himself but for something greater, for Greece.
And his conviction became a hopeful reality, he did won the Boston Marathon of 1946, the papers of the time say that Kyriakides shouted “For Greece” as he crossed the finish line. Was his body or his spirit making this victory possible… On 23 May 1946, Kyriakides returned to Greece, where about one million Greeks greeted him as a hero. Then, a formal ceremony was held at the Temple of Zeus, where Kyriakides stating : “I am proud to be Greek ” moving to the crowd. For the first time since the Nazi’s Occupation the Acropolis was illuminated in his honor.
   A sculpture of Kyriakides called “The Spirit of the Marathon” was unveiled in Boston in 2004.
   Kyriakides is an example of faith towards the self, in this perspective he’s not just a modern athlete but his lineage of spirit follows that of the first marathon runner, the legendary Pheidippides and his ceaseless flame.

~The Riace warriors or else the treasures of the sea~
   The Riace bronzes are two magnificent full size greek statues of naked bearded warriors, created around 460-420 B.C. The warriors were rediscovered in 1972 and they’re now located at the Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia in Reggio Calabria, Italy.
   The statues of these two powerful men belong to the early classical style of ancient Greek sculpture, some say they are works of the famous Phidias himself or of his pupils. Sure thing is that these two statues were part of a greater complex of statues, perhaps a memorial tribute of thirteen bronze statues from Delphi. It is also rumoured that one of these two warriors is the general Miltiades, victor of the battle of Marathon himself and that the other twelve statues portrayed heroes and gods. I guess we’ll never know so let’s stop to admire their beauty, that will do…

Perceptions of femininity.    The fourteen “Korai of the Acropolis” (maidens, young girls) represent priestesses or just the young female archetype of the archaic era and they are dedicated to the goddess Athena. They are finely dressed and graceful, most are smiling in a rather mysterious way, it is like they know something that they cannot share with the rest of the world but this secret knowledge makes them serene. Somehow their external beauty seems to stem from an inner belief and not just their physics or the elaboration of their looks. They are surely stylized to serve certain proportions of being, an ideal. No struggle of actual puberty is obvious on them, they are rather otherworldly. The word “Kore” instantly brings Persephone to the mind, being the prevalent “nickname” of the goddess of both fertility and the underworld affairs.    Kore of Euthydikos or else “the sulky Kore” is the less cheerful young maiden of them all, created around 490-485 B.C., she seems to carry a gloomy charm belonging to a rather strict style of sculpture, she’s remarkable nonetheless.  

Perceptions of femininity.
   The fourteen “Korai of the Acropolis” (maidens, young girls) represent priestesses or just the young female archetype of the archaic era and they are dedicated to the goddess Athena. They are finely dressed and graceful, most are smiling in a rather mysterious way, it is like they know something that they cannot share with the rest of the world but this secret knowledge makes them serene. Somehow their external beauty seems to stem from an inner belief and not just their physics or the elaboration of their looks. They are surely stylized to serve certain proportions of being, an ideal. No struggle of actual puberty is obvious on them, they are rather otherworldly. The word “Kore” instantly brings Persephone to the mind, being the prevalent “nickname” of the goddess of both fertility and the underworld affairs.
   Kore of Euthydikos or else “the sulky Kore” is the less cheerful young maiden of them all, created around 490-485 B.C., she seems to carry a gloomy charm belonging to a rather strict style of sculpture, she’s remarkable nonetheless.
  

~The sacred snake of Asclepius had the skill to heal miraculously by leaking the patient. This was the nature of Asclepius’ remedy in Epidaurus. The dog was also an essential symbol of the god. Pausanias writes that Asclepius, son of Apollo, was born in Epidaurus and then was abandoned by his mother there. The divine child was raised by a goat and was protected by a dog. The sheppard Aresthanas found the baby but saw a flash similar to lightning wrapping the young god and fled terrified. The infant grew up to obtain the fame of the wondrous healer who could resurrect the dead.~
Asclepius attending to a thorn in the foot of Venus by Sir Edward John Poynter, 1880.

~The sacred snake of Asclepius had the skill to heal miraculously by leaking the patient. This was the nature of Asclepius’ remedy in Epidaurus. The dog was also an essential symbol of the god. Pausanias writes that Asclepius, son of Apollo, was born in Epidaurus and then was abandoned by his mother there. The divine child was raised by a goat and was protected by a dog. The sheppard Aresthanas found the baby but saw a flash similar to lightning wrapping the young god and fled terrified. The infant grew up to obtain the fame of the wondrous healer who could resurrect the dead.~

Asclepius attending to a thorn in the foot of Venus by Sir Edward John Poynter, 1880.

Healing god+Asclepius, originally an earth god, sent healing oracles through the road of dreams. The person in need of treatment slept on holy ground with his ear touching the earth so to receive the therapeutic dream. There are those like Homer who thought Asclepius was human, some others even believed that Asclepius had been an actual man; a doctor that received heroic honors after death and gradually obtained divine character and existence. In this view Asclepius resembles the egyptian doctor Imhotep, who had been an actual person but also obtained divinity.

Healing god+
Asclepius, originally an earth god, sent healing oracles through the road of dreams. The person in need of treatment slept on holy ground with his ear touching the earth so to receive the therapeutic dream. There are those like Homer who thought Asclepius was human, some others even believed that Asclepius had been an actual man; a doctor that received heroic honors after death and gradually obtained divine character and existence. In this view Asclepius resembles the egyptian doctor Imhotep, who had been an actual person but also obtained divinity.