~The Riace warriors or else the treasures of the sea~
   The Riace bronzes are two magnificent full size greek statues of naked bearded warriors, created around 460-420 B.C. The warriors were rediscovered in 1972 and they’re now located at the Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia in Reggio Calabria, Italy.
   The statues of these two powerful men belong to the early classical style of ancient Greek sculpture, some say they are works of the famous Phidias himself or of his pupils. Sure thing is that these two statues were part of a greater complex of statues, perhaps a memorial tribute of thirteen bronze statues from Delphi. It is also rumoured that one of these two warriors is the general Miltiades, victor of the battle of Marathon himself and that the other twelve statues portrayed heroes and gods. I guess we’ll never know so let’s stop to admire their beauty, that will do…

Perceptions of femininity.    The fourteen “Korai of the Acropolis” (maidens, young girls) represent priestesses or just the young female archetype of the archaic era and they are dedicated to the goddess Athena. They are finely dressed and graceful, most are smiling in a rather mysterious way, it is like they know something that they cannot share with the rest of the world but this secret knowledge makes them serene. Somehow their external beauty seems to stem from an inner belief and not just their physics or the elaboration of their looks. They are surely stylized to serve certain proportions of being, an ideal. No struggle of actual puberty is obvious on them, they are rather otherworldly. The word “Kore” instantly brings Persephone to the mind, being the prevalent “nickname” of the goddess of both fertility and the underworld affairs.    Kore of Euthydikos or else “the sulky Kore” is the less cheerful young maiden of them all, created around 490-485 B.C., she seems to carry a gloomy charm belonging to a rather strict style of sculpture, she’s remarkable nonetheless.  

Perceptions of femininity.
   The fourteen “Korai of the Acropolis” (maidens, young girls) represent priestesses or just the young female archetype of the archaic era and they are dedicated to the goddess Athena. They are finely dressed and graceful, most are smiling in a rather mysterious way, it is like they know something that they cannot share with the rest of the world but this secret knowledge makes them serene. Somehow their external beauty seems to stem from an inner belief and not just their physics or the elaboration of their looks. They are surely stylized to serve certain proportions of being, an ideal. No struggle of actual puberty is obvious on them, they are rather otherworldly. The word “Kore” instantly brings Persephone to the mind, being the prevalent “nickname” of the goddess of both fertility and the underworld affairs.
   Kore of Euthydikos or else “the sulky Kore” is the less cheerful young maiden of them all, created around 490-485 B.C., she seems to carry a gloomy charm belonging to a rather strict style of sculpture, she’s remarkable nonetheless.
  

~The sacred snake of Asclepius had the skill to heal miraculously by leaking the patient. This was the nature of Asclepius’ remedy in Epidaurus. The dog was also an essential symbol of the god. Pausanias writes that Asclepius, son of Apollo, was born in Epidaurus and then was abandoned by his mother there. The divine child was raised by a goat and was protected by a dog. The sheppard Aresthanas found the baby but saw a flash similar to lightning wrapping the young god and fled terrified. The infant grew up to obtain the fame of the wondrous healer who could resurrect the dead.~
Asclepius attending to a thorn in the foot of Venus by Sir Edward John Poynter, 1880.

~The sacred snake of Asclepius had the skill to heal miraculously by leaking the patient. This was the nature of Asclepius’ remedy in Epidaurus. The dog was also an essential symbol of the god. Pausanias writes that Asclepius, son of Apollo, was born in Epidaurus and then was abandoned by his mother there. The divine child was raised by a goat and was protected by a dog. The sheppard Aresthanas found the baby but saw a flash similar to lightning wrapping the young god and fled terrified. The infant grew up to obtain the fame of the wondrous healer who could resurrect the dead.~

Asclepius attending to a thorn in the foot of Venus by Sir Edward John Poynter, 1880.

Healing god+Asclepius, originally an earth god, sent healing oracles through the road of dreams. The person in need of treatment slept on holy ground with his ear touching the earth so to receive the therapeutic dream. There are those like Homer who thought Asclepius was human, some others even believed that Asclepius had been an actual man; a doctor that received heroic honors after death and gradually obtained divine character and existence. In this view Asclepius resembles the egyptian doctor Imhotep, who had been an actual person but also obtained divinity.

Healing god+
Asclepius, originally an earth god, sent healing oracles through the road of dreams. The person in need of treatment slept on holy ground with his ear touching the earth so to receive the therapeutic dream. There are those like Homer who thought Asclepius was human, some others even believed that Asclepius had been an actual man; a doctor that received heroic honors after death and gradually obtained divine character and existence. In this view Asclepius resembles the egyptian doctor Imhotep, who had been an actual person but also obtained divinity.

One has to wait and see…While excavations continue in the macedonian tomb in ancient Amphipolis, Greece, questions and riddles keep on arising…Who’s the owner or owners of this unique and extraordinary monument?…Theories and preconceptions can’t do much good since mostly based on prejudices and modern day neurosis, one must know the art of waiting while being hopeful…And soon we’ll know how the mighty lion is connected to the sphinxes and how the lovely caryatids have served as sleepless guards throughout the centuries…All symbols of power and glamour of another era with different perceptions on life and death.

…And there’s the other version of Dionysus when he takes the form of the divine and eternal boy child Iacchus.Ovid writes about young Iacchus:"Tu puer aeternus, tu formosissimus altoConspiceris coelo tibi, cum sine cornibus astas,Virgineum caput est…”Iacchus is the companion of Demeter and Persephone and a prevalent deity of the Eleusinian Mysteries. He’s the “freshly dug” boy, that is an epithet echoing his phallic character and source, he’s the product of a coitus still very much close to the stage of nutrition as psychoanalysis points it, in this aspect he’s the edible fruit of the field and also called Demeter’s daemon, that’s is Demeter’s libido.Persephone and the edible fruit, pomegranate by Margaret Evans Prince, 1940..

…And there’s the other version of Dionysus when he takes the form of the divine and eternal boy child Iacchus.
Ovid writes about young Iacchus:
"Tu puer aeternus, tu formosissimus alto
Conspiceris coelo tibi, cum sine cornibus astas,
Virgineum caput est…”

Iacchus is the companion of Demeter and Persephone and a prevalent deity of the Eleusinian Mysteries. He’s the “freshly dug” boy, that is an epithet echoing his phallic character and source, he’s the product of a coitus still very much close to the stage of nutrition as psychoanalysis points it, in this aspect he’s the edible fruit of the field and also called Demeter’s daemon, that’s is Demeter’s libido.

Persephone and the edible fruit, pomegranate by Margaret Evans Prince, 1940.
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~A lament on the nature of the lost object~Is Aphrodite’s grief over the loss of her lover Adonis a different kind of sadness than that of the sharp cut of any bond in all important relationships?…How do we continue to revive the relation inside our head when the object is long gone?…The death doesn’t have to be an actuality, all sorts of disruptions can be felt like death inside the psychic reality. It is the nature of the fission that always activates the unconscious reaction, that one of the lost paradise motifeme, in the end we don’t lose a lover or a relationship but the chance to return to a state of total innocence and safety inside our first environment, the cave we were once complete, that is the womb and aftewards our first encounter and squeeze with eros, the good breast during the nursing of the infant.Aphrodite’s lament over Adonis’ death by Bryson Burroughs.

~A lament on the nature of the lost object~
Is Aphrodite’s grief over the loss of her lover Adonis a different kind of sadness than that of the sharp cut of any bond in all important relationships?…How do we continue to revive the relation inside our head when the object is long gone?…The death doesn’t have to be an actuality, all sorts of disruptions can be felt like death inside the psychic reality. It is the nature of the fission that always activates the unconscious reaction, that one of the lost paradise motifeme, in the end we don’t lose a lover or a relationship but the chance to return to a state of total innocence and safety inside our first environment, the cave we were once complete, that is the womb and aftewards our first encounter and squeeze with eros, the good breast during the nursing of the infant.

Aphrodite’s lament over Adonis’ death by Bryson Burroughs.

~Partly human, partly divine~Dioscuri, the emblematic twins, stand as a symbol of the two natured essence of humanity. One of the brothers is mortal while the other half of the duo is immortal, just like our human nature that is both a bodily, that is perishable experience and one participating in the cosmic soul, therefore eternal. The brothers are both different and the same, that is also the struggle of the individual to comprehend the limitations of the carnal existence but also the incorruptible freedom of the psychic powers hidden inside…Another pair of Dioscuri could be Hercules and his  brother Iphicles. Hercules gains immortality and a position close to the sun for all eternity while Iphicles dies. The pattern of Dioscuri, mortal and immortal, represents in mythology the pattern of the setting and the rising sun, a ceaseless phenomenon resembling the passing of human generations, one generation dies to leave room for the next one, that is continuation and rebirth at the same time.Dioscuri, the brothers Kleobis and Biton, 585 B.C., Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Greece.

~Partly human, partly divine~

Dioscuri, the emblematic twins, stand as a symbol of the two natured essence of humanity. One of the brothers is mortal while the other half of the duo is immortal, just like our human nature that is both a bodily, that is perishable experience and one participating in the cosmic soul, therefore eternal. The brothers are both different and the same, that is also the struggle of the individual to comprehend the limitations of the carnal existence but also the incorruptible freedom of the psychic powers hidden inside…Another pair of Dioscuri could be Hercules and his  brother Iphicles. Hercules gains immortality and a position close to the sun for all eternity while Iphicles dies. The pattern of Dioscuri, mortal and immortal, represents in mythology the pattern of the setting and the rising sun, a ceaseless phenomenon resembling the passing of human generations, one generation dies to leave room for the next one, that is continuation and rebirth at the same time.

Dioscuri, the brothers Kleobis and Biton, 585 B.C., Archaeological Museum of Delphi, Greece.