~In the same way that the lovers emerge gradually from the beauty, which is evident in delicate forms, to the beauty that is divine, in the same way the priests, when they perceived that there was a specific correlation and togetherness between two natural phenomena , but also and between objects that expressed arcane powers and they discovered that in this manner everything is surviving inside everything, then they (the priests) fabricated a sacred science out of this mutual harmony and similarity.~Proclus, the Neoplatonist philosopher (c. 410-485 AD),  on the Doctrine of the Signatures, a hypothesis and theory declaring that certain appearances and similarities in natural things lead to  further co-operations, treatments and unveiling of secrets beneficial for the growth of the human knowledge and healing, through this doctrine people intuitively learnt how to use the herbs so to treat certain diseases following the belief that the outer form of the herb indicated a similarity with its purpose in healing. The doctrine is also valid when someone wants to evaluate the character and inner qualities of a person by estimating how much his/her outer presence matches an inner reality and properties, the doctrine is put in practice once we’re mentioning natural states of being and only, that’s its limitation and somehow blessing.The Bacchante by Jean-Leon Gerome, 1853.

~In the same way that the lovers emerge gradually from the beauty, which is evident in delicate forms, to the beauty that is divine, in the same way the priests, when they perceived that there was a specific correlation and togetherness between two natural phenomena , but also and between objects that expressed arcane powers and they discovered that in this manner everything is surviving inside everything, then they (the priests) fabricated a sacred science out of this mutual harmony and similarity.~
Proclus, the Neoplatonist philosopher (c. 410-485 AD),  on the Doctrine of the Signatures, a hypothesis and theory declaring that certain appearances and similarities in natural things lead to  further co-operations, treatments and unveiling of secrets beneficial for the growth of the human knowledge and healing, through this doctrine people intuitively learnt how to use the herbs so to treat certain diseases following the belief that the outer form of the herb indicated a similarity with its purpose in healing. The doctrine is also valid when someone wants to evaluate the character and inner qualities of a person by estimating how much his/her outer presence matches an inner reality and properties, the doctrine is put in practice once we’re mentioning natural states of being and only, that’s its limitation and somehow blessing.

The Bacchante by Jean-Leon Gerome, 1853.

~Ah me, how sudden have the storms of Fate,
Beyond all thought, all apprehension, burst
On my devoted head! O Fortune, Fortune!
With what relentless fury hath thy hand
Hurl’d desolation on the Persian race!
Wo unsupportable! The torturing thought
Of our lost youth comes rushing on my mind,
And sinks me to the ground. O Jove, that
Had died with those brave men that died in fight I~
"The Persians" by Aeschylus.

How daring and innovative sounds till our days a writer to dedicate a whole play to  the enemies of his country, that’s Aeschylus’ case when writing “The Persians”, an antiwar cry against greed and obstinance of mind. King Xerxes is no equal in glory compared to his godlike father Darius but he has to find that out in the most bitter way by sacrificing the youth and future of great Persia. The venerable mother of Xerxes, Atossa refinds her son after his defeat and humilation but she can feel no comfort in the thought that her son is responsible for the loss of many, a mother can only bare while remaining wise inside her grief. Aeschylus writes while he has no intention to underestimate the magnitude of the persian suffering, on the contrary he feels for them conveying an ageless message, a message against blind power and violence of the numbers, one we know very well in our modernity as well. Some warnings are forever, let’s stop now and listen…

In the photos: “The Persians” as presented by The National Theatre of Northern Greece, in the role of Darius’ ghost the legendary greek actor Yannis Fertis. One of the most enjoyable aspects of greek summer is the plethora of options the audience has when choosing to see theatrical adaptations of ancient greek plays and most of those plays speak with the words of the past a language of today.

//Venus Cythereia//Aphrodite, the goddess of lust, emerged naked from the foam of the sea, her first stop on land was in Cythera, since the island was small she then passed to Peloponnese and then to Pafos in Cyprus where she established her worship. Grass and flowers were blooming where she had stepped. Ores (Hours), the daughters of Themis went to her to dress her and adorn her.The Birth of Venus by William Adolphe Bouguereau, 1879.

//Venus Cythereia//

Aphrodite, the goddess of lust, emerged naked from the foam of the sea, her first stop on land was in Cythera, since the island was small she then passed to Peloponnese and then to Pafos in Cyprus where she established her worship. Grass and flowers were blooming where she had stepped. Ores (Hours), the daughters of Themis went to her to dress her and adorn her.

The Birth of Venus by William Adolphe Bouguereau, 1879.

~Reviving the primordial proportions and holy geometry shapes~
Martha Graham’s Dance Company’s the Greek Connection show manages to capture the original spirit of the legendary choreographer and founder of the dance company and yet challenge new audiences. The movement is continuously flowing while the perfection of the posture is of great essence as well. The myth dictates but doesn’t restrain the choreography, this is a must see spectacle for everyone interested in ancient greece and wants to form an idea of how the ancient rituals should look like even if any adaptation and attempt to reach them is mostly a fiction of contemporary imagination…

//A link to the afterlife//Necromancy wasn’t that uncommon as a practice in ancient greece. Although many times we mention the classical antiquity while referring to the birth of rationalism and punctuality the truth is that back in the days prejudice was very much alive as well as mysticism…The need to contact your deceased ones and decipher the meaning of the afterlife will never cease to fascinate the human imagination and anxiety. Odysseus visits the underworld in the book 11 of the Odyssey (else called Nekyia) to consult the soul of the prophet Teiresias concerning his desired return to Ithaca. The underworld of the Odyssey is a place of phantasmagoria where the souls wander endlessly and without a rest. The soul must be fed with sacrificial blood so to remember its initial state, a ram is sacrificed for this purpose, this is a material link to the previous life of the dead, an earthly reminder. Just like Odysseus many were the actual people to visit similar oracles for the underworld experience and perhaps initiation. “Netherworld” by Robert Temple is a very much interesting quest on the matter.photo: Arcade of the Acheron oracle of the dead.

//A link to the afterlife//
Necromancy wasn’t that uncommon as a practice in ancient greece. Although many times we mention the classical antiquity while referring to the birth of rationalism and punctuality the truth is that back in the days prejudice was very much alive as well as mysticism…The need to contact your deceased ones and decipher the meaning of the afterlife will never cease to fascinate the human imagination and anxiety. Odysseus visits the underworld in the book 11 of the Odyssey (else called Nekyia) to consult the soul of the prophet Teiresias concerning his desired return to Ithaca. The underworld of the Odyssey is a place of phantasmagoria where the souls wander endlessly and without a rest. The soul must be fed with sacrificial blood so to remember its initial state, a ram is sacrificed for this purpose, this is a material link to the previous life of the dead, an earthly reminder. Just like Odysseus many were the actual people to visit similar oracles for the underworld experience and perhaps initiation. “Netherworld” by Robert Temple is a very much interesting quest on the matter.

photo: Arcade of the Acheron oracle of the dead.

//On the dynamics of fluidity//Although the mighty god of the sea, Poseidon’s first appearances in myths are very much associated with mother earth and  the forms of the sheep, the ram and the horse, the last one becoming Poseidon’s sacred animal. Goddess Rhea gave birth to Poseidon and then she hid the infant inside a flock of sheep so to protect him from his devouring father, Cronus (a deity connected with the consuming aspects of Time). Cronus ate a small colt instead of Poseidon, that’s the detail of the myth perhaps enhancing the symbolism of the horse as Poseidon’s favorite totemic identification. Some other myth tells of Poseidon’s dwelling among the chthonic demons, the Telchines, powerful artisans they were…Telchines were the ones to buit the trident of Poseidon, his archetypal symbol of manhood, strength and dominion over the endless oceans…Poseidon as the god of the fluid natured and ever flowing waters but also one with a more terrestrial beginnings may signify the unison of the two elements, water and earth, a unison and collaboration bringing to mind the first human enviroment that is the womb…Poseidon and Amphitrite by Jacob de Gheyn II.

//On the dynamics of fluidity//

Although the mighty god of the sea, Poseidon’s first appearances in myths are very much associated with mother earth and  the forms of the sheep, the ram and the horse, the last one becoming Poseidon’s sacred animal. Goddess Rhea gave birth to Poseidon and then she hid the infant inside a flock of sheep so to protect him from his devouring father, Cronus (a deity connected with the consuming aspects of Time). Cronus ate a small colt instead of Poseidon, that’s the detail of the myth perhaps enhancing the symbolism of the horse as Poseidon’s favorite totemic identification. Some other myth tells of Poseidon’s dwelling among the chthonic demons, the Telchines, powerful artisans they were…Telchines were the ones to buit the trident of Poseidon, his archetypal symbol of manhood, strength and dominion over the endless oceans…Poseidon as the god of the fluid natured and ever flowing waters but also one with a more terrestrial beginnings may signify the unison of the two elements, water and earth, a unison and collaboration bringing to mind the first human enviroment that is the womb…

Poseidon and Amphitrite by Jacob de Gheyn II.

~The story or more precisely the tragedy of Oedipus belongs to the same core and family of myths concerning the origins of the divine child, Oedipus faces the cruelty of life right away after his birth just like Hercules (or else Herakles), Perseus or even the god Dionysus do. Oedipus is someone, a child soon to become a man, without a clear identity and knowledge of his anchestry, is that the reason responsible for his blind concsience while murdering his own father? Is there any possibility that his murderous act was a concealed will of the abandoned child to punish the negligent father, Laius for his ferocity and lack of love that led him to desert the infant Oedipus? Can we actually form a pyschologically secure world growing up in the absence of the important others or is it the presence and the stereotypes inflicted to us from those important others when imbalanced that hurt us the most?…Psychoanalytically speaking every contribution or lack of contribution while in our way towards our personal identity is essential. Perhaps cruelty was a virus Oedipus inherited from his father while not knowing it, but as in most cases hardness is a charactheristic mostly devouring its bearer…The end of the tragedy finds Oedipus aware although shocked, blinded physically but open in the inside, vast…and albeit our modern worship of blind logic admires mostly the resolving of the Sphinx’s riddle by Oedipus as his greatest intellectual feat a closer look and understanding will reveal that Oedipus’ greatest contribution was his transcedence of pain that only truth offered to him…~Oedipus and the Sphinx by François-Emile Ehrmann, 1903.

~The story or more precisely the tragedy of Oedipus belongs to the same core and family of myths concerning the origins of the divine child, Oedipus faces the cruelty of life right away after his birth just like Hercules (or else Herakles), Perseus or even the god Dionysus do. Oedipus is someone, a child soon to become a man, without a clear identity and knowledge of his anchestry, is that the reason responsible for his blind concsience while murdering his own father? Is there any possibility that his murderous act was a concealed will of the abandoned child to punish the negligent father, Laius for his ferocity and lack of love that led him to desert the infant Oedipus? Can we actually form a pyschologically secure world growing up in the absence of the important others or is it the presence and the stereotypes inflicted to us from those important others when imbalanced that hurt us the most?…Psychoanalytically speaking every contribution or lack of contribution while in our way towards our personal identity is essential. Perhaps cruelty was a virus Oedipus inherited from his father while not knowing it, but as in most cases hardness is a charactheristic mostly devouring its bearer…The end of the tragedy finds Oedipus aware although shocked, blinded physically but open in the inside, vast…and albeit our modern worship of blind logic admires mostly the resolving of the Sphinx’s riddle by Oedipus as his greatest intellectual feat a closer look and understanding will reveal that Oedipus’ greatest contribution was his transcedence of pain that only truth offered to him…~

Oedipus and the Sphinx by François-Emile Ehrmann, 1903.

The moon or else the fluid and flowing nature of the goddess prototype, the female energy inside all things.

The moon is ever present, she is observing. Even when she vanishes before the new moon she’s there, she manifests in the dreamy and the fluid, the seemingly illusionary aspects of our senses that enable us to appreciate the mysterious and the poetic, the deep waters of our subconscious, inside the feminine.

The goddess emerges. Like the Aphrodite coming out of the shell, waves are splashing on her naked body, she seems pure, enchanting in her own simplicity. This imago strikes our fancy, a universal archetype, the young daughter (Kore) who is about to learn the ways of love, is she a child…is she a woman?…not yet. She’s the element and the psyche.

She takes many forms and she hears to many names, she’s the duet of the Mother and Daughter in Eleusis, Demeter and Persephone, she’s the keeper of the gates, the light bearer, the Titaness Hecate (worshipped in the holy island of Samothrace), she’s the eternally virgin Pallas Athena (immaculate daughter of Metis, wisdom) or the beautiful Leda who unsuspected, unaware of the lust coming her way, received  the sperm of Zeus when he took the shape of a swan, her myths carry the symbolic and the everlasting, she’s Freya in scandinavia, Brighid in ireland, Isis in egypt and Astarte or Innanna in the middle east. She’s the triple goddess just like the three phases of the moon and the three ages of woman, three stages to embrace unison.
Our mother, our daughter, our mistress, our friend…the witch and the enchanting or the protective one, THE MUSE.
Who will compose and sing a new song for her tomorrow?…

Until a new feminity…of the spiritual and the physical, the vibrant and the liberating we’ll stay still and and try to absorb once again her first poem of the creation, her unafraid ecstasy and orgasm.

The moon is watching†††.
Article taken from: http://imagoplus.blogspot.gr/search?updated-max=2013-09-16T15:34:00-07:00&max-results=7
A blog dedicated to the concept of dialectics and transcedence.