~”The idea that rivers are gods and springs divine nymphs is deeply rooted not only in poetry but in belief and ritual; the worship of these deities is limited only by the fact that they are inseparably identified with a specific locality.”~Walter BurkertA Nymph in the Forest by Charles Amable Lenoir.

~”The idea that rivers are gods and springs divine nymphs is deeply rooted not only in poetry but in belief and ritual; the worship of these deities is limited only by the fact that they are inseparably identified with a specific locality.”~
Walter Burkert

A Nymph in the Forest by Charles Amable Lenoir.

~I read the definition of catharsis (κάθαρσις), word archaic and grand, meaningful as a purpose :
1.  Medicine Purgation, especially for the digestive system.
2.  A purifying or figurative cleansing of the emotions, especially pity and fear, described by Aristotle as an effect of tragic drama on its audience.
3.  A release of emotional tension, as after an overwhelming experience, that restores or refreshes the spirit.
4.  Psychology
a.  A technique used to relieve tension and anxiety by bringing repressed feelings and fears to consciousness.
b.  The therapeutic result of this process; abreaction.//It screams relief and restoration//If we think of important ancient greek mysteries and perhaps a catharsis during initiation rituals the mysteries of the Cabeiri come to mind, those enigmatic deities, the great gods, spirits of nature and its magic but also of crafts…Photo: water is iasis (healing),island of Samothrace and marvelous natural beauty, Greece.

~I read the definition of catharsis (κάθαρσις), word archaic and grand, meaningful as a purpose :

1. Medicine Purgation, especially for the digestive system.
2. A purifying or figurative cleansing of the emotions, especially pity and fear, described by Aristotle as an effect of tragic drama on its audience.
3. A release of emotional tension, as after an overwhelming experience, that restores or refreshes the spirit.
4. Psychology
a. A technique used to relieve tension and anxiety by bringing repressed feelings and fears to consciousness.
b. The therapeutic result of this process; abreaction.

//It screams relief and restoration//

If we think of important ancient greek mysteries and perhaps a catharsis during initiation rituals the mysteries of the Cabeiri come to mind, those enigmatic deities, the great gods, spirits of nature and its magic but also of crafts…
Photo: water is iasis (healing),island of Samothrace and marvelous natural beauty, Greece.
~It only happens that sometimes I find your ‘interest’ quite repressing, you appear to be using almost the proper words but your message fails to come through, I say why don’t you let me be me and let yourself become possibilities as well? Let’s invest on timeless communication outside of categories and fruitless exaggerations~Questions of Time and Space, the eternal returning and meditation on the nature of interaction, Soul wandering trying to capture the essence of the Form…Vastness+Landscape around the arcaeological site of Delphi, Greece.

~It only happens that sometimes I find your ‘interest’ quite repressing, you appear to be using almost the proper words but your message fails to come through, I say why don’t you let me be me and let yourself become possibilities as well? Let’s invest on timeless communication outside of categories and fruitless exaggerations~
Questions of Time and Space, the eternal returning and meditation on the nature of interaction, Soul wandering trying to capture the essence of the Form…Vastness+
Landscape around the arcaeological site of Delphi, Greece.

~ A goddess in despair~The lament of Aphrodite is for her lost lover, the handsome and unforgettable Adonis. The young hunter was killed by a wild boar possibly sent after him by the goddess Artemis who got jealous of his hunting skills or she just wanted to hurt Aphrodite’s feelings…Aphrodite was meant to cry for Adonis instead of having him by her side eternally. The celebrations intended to revere the traumatized love of the goddess represented the day of the meeting but also the day of the separation of the goddess of love from her young lover. Adonis, the beautiful youth, was lying beloved but also mourned. The women partaking the ritual had to offer small “gardens” to Adonis, flowers that grew up fast but also faded away fast…Does love last longer than a blink of an eye?… but why does the weeping seem to last an eternity?…The best sacrifice to Adonis is a lock of  beautiful hair signifying perhaps the passing nature of beauty in life but if that’s too sorrowful and not comforting at all one should think of an Adonis reborn and of Aphrodite falling for him all over again…Venus Lamenting the Death of Adonis by Benjamin West, 1768.

~ A goddess in despair~
The lament of Aphrodite is for her lost lover, the handsome and unforgettable Adonis. The young hunter was killed by a wild boar possibly sent after him by the goddess Artemis who got jealous of his hunting skills or she just wanted to hurt Aphrodite’s feelings…Aphrodite was meant to cry for Adonis instead of having him by her side eternally. The celebrations intended to revere the traumatized love of the goddess represented the day of the meeting but also the day of the separation of the goddess of love from her young lover. Adonis, the beautiful youth, was lying beloved but also mourned. The women partaking the ritual had to offer small “gardens” to Adonis, flowers that grew up fast but also faded away fast…
Does love last longer than a blink of an eye?… but why does the weeping seem to last an eternity?…The best sacrifice to Adonis is a lock of  beautiful hair signifying perhaps the passing nature of beauty in life but if that’s too sorrowful and not comforting at all one should think of an Adonis reborn and of Aphrodite falling for him all over again…

Venus Lamenting the Death of Adonis by Benjamin West, 1768.

//Mothering Beauty and Eros//Orphic Hymn to Aphrodite.A Hymn. Heav’nly [Ourania], illustrious, laughter-loving queen, sea-born, night-loving, of an awful mien; Crafty, from whom necessity [Ananke] first came, producing, nightly, all-connecting dame: ‘Tis thine the world with harmony to join, for all things spring from thee, O pow’r divine. The triple Fates [Moirai] are rul’d by thy decree, and all productions yield alike to thee: Whate’er the heav’ns, encircling all contain, earth fruit-producing, and the stormy main,  Thy sway confesses, and obeys thy nod, awful attendant of the brumal God [Bakkhos]: Goddess of marriage, charming to the sight, mother of Loves [Eortes], whom banquetings delight; Source of persuasion [Peitho], secret, fav’ring queen, illustrious born, apparent and unseen: Spousal, lupercal, and to men inclin’d, prolific, most-desir’d, life-giving., kind: Great sceptre-bearer of the Gods, ‘tis thine, mortals in necessary bands to join;  And ev’ry tribe of savage monsters dire in magic chains to bind, thro’ mad desire. Come, Cyprus-born, and to my pray’r incline, whether exalted in the heav’ns you shine, Or pleas’d in Syria’s temple to preside, or o’er th’ Egyptian plains thy car to guide, Fashion’d of gold; and near its sacred flood, fertile and fam’d to fix thy blest abode; Or if rejoicing in the azure shores, near where the sea with foaming billows roars,  The circling choirs of mortals, thy delight, or beauteous nymphs, with eyes cerulean bright, Pleas’d by the dusty banks renown’d of old, to drive thy rapid, two-yok’d car of gold; Or if in Cyprus with thy mother fair, where married females praise thee ev’ry year, And beauteous virgins in the chorus join, Adonis pure to sing and thee divine; Come, all-attractive to my pray’r inclin’d, for thee, I call, with holy, reverent mind.Statue: Aphrodite of Cnidus, copy of one of the most famous works of the renowned ancient greek sculptor Praxiteles. The statue became famous for its beauty, meant to be appreciated from every angle, and for being the first life-size representation of the nude female form. It depicted the goddessAphrodite as she prepared for the ritual bath that restored her purity (not virginity), discarding her drapery in her left hand, while modestly shielding herself with her right hand. Her hands are placed in a motion that simultaneously shields her womanhood and draws attention to her nudity. Conservatives were meant to be shocked back in the days (4th Century BC)!

//Mothering Beauty and Eros//

Orphic Hymn to Aphrodite.
A Hymn.
Heav’nly [Ourania], illustrious, laughter-loving queen, sea-born, night-loving, of an awful mien;
Crafty, from whom necessity [Ananke] first came, producing, nightly, all-connecting dame:
‘Tis thine the world with harmony to join, for all things spring from thee, O pow’r divine.
The triple Fates [Moirai] are rul’d by thy decree, and all productions yield alike to thee:
Whate’er the heav’ns, encircling all contain, earth fruit-producing, and the stormy main,
Thy sway confesses, and obeys thy nod, awful attendant of the brumal God [Bakkhos]:
Goddess of marriage, charming to the sight, mother of Loves [Eortes], whom banquetings delight;
Source of persuasion [Peitho], secret, fav’ring queen, illustrious born, apparent and unseen:
Spousal, lupercal, and to men inclin’d, prolific, most-desir’d, life-giving., kind:
Great sceptre-bearer of the Gods, ‘tis thine, mortals in necessary bands to join;
And ev’ry tribe of savage monsters dire in magic chains to bind, thro’ mad desire.
Come, Cyprus-born, and to my pray’r incline, whether exalted in the heav’ns you shine,
Or pleas’d in Syria’s temple to preside, or o’er th’ Egyptian plains thy car to guide,
Fashion’d of gold; and near its sacred flood, fertile and fam’d to fix thy blest abode;
Or if rejoicing in the azure shores, near where the sea with foaming billows roars,
The circling choirs of mortals, thy delight, or beauteous nymphs, with eyes cerulean bright,
Pleas’d by the dusty banks renown’d of old, to drive thy rapid, two-yok’d car of gold;
Or if in Cyprus with thy mother fair, where married females praise thee ev’ry year,
And beauteous virgins in the chorus join, Adonis pure to sing and thee divine;
Come, all-attractive to my pray’r inclin’d, for thee, I call, with holy, reverent mind.

Statue: Aphrodite of Cnidus, copy of one of the most famous works of the renowned ancient greek sculptor Praxiteles. The statue became famous for its beauty, meant to be appreciated from every angle, and for being the first life-size representation of the nude female form. It depicted the goddessAphrodite as she prepared for the ritual bath that restored her purity (not virginity), discarding her drapery in her left hand, while modestly shielding herself with her right hand. Her hands are placed in a motion that simultaneously shields her womanhood and draws attention to her nudity. Conservatives were meant to be shocked back in the days (4th Century BC)!

//Sacred Bee//The Gods of Olympus fed on nectar and ambrosia . Hesiod and Pindar report that Aristaeus ,  son of Apollo, god of music and harmony , and of Cyrene , daughter of the king of the Lapiths Ypseas, was the rapporteur of the cultivation of bees , grapes and olives , the patron saint of shepherds and hunters , treating medicine and divination . Aristaeus was born in Libya and Hermes took him and carried him to Gaia and the Hours to raise him . First stop of Aristaeus was the greek island of Kea where the inhabitants were taught the beekeeping by him. So Aristaeus was the first inventor of the useful and divine art of beekeeping.Tetradrachm of Ephesos with bee, Greek, Late Classical or Early Hellenistic Period, about 390–325 B.C.

//Sacred Bee//
The Gods of Olympus fed on nectar and ambrosia . Hesiod and Pindar report that Aristaeus ,  son of Apollo, god of music and harmony , and of Cyrene , daughter of the king of the Lapiths Ypseas, was the rapporteur of the cultivation of bees , grapes and olives , the patron saint of shepherds and hunters , treating medicine and divination . Aristaeus was born in Libya and Hermes took him and carried him to Gaia and the Hours to raise him . First stop of Aristaeus was the greek island of Kea where the inhabitants were taught the beekeeping by him. So Aristaeus was the first inventor of the useful and divine art of beekeeping.

Tetradrachm of Ephesos with bee,

Greek, Late Classical or Early Hellenistic Period, about 390–325 B.C.